style

shoes-150
The last time we looked, a new pair of Manolos cost about $650 and Tod’s loafers ran at least $400. Maybe last year we could afford to splurge on the newest and nicest, but for many of us, this season the shoe budget is now the rent payment. So how to make do with the shoes you have or at least find new styles that won’t put you in the red? Check out these seven ways to get the most out of your kicks this spring—without getting kicked out of your apartment.

Stylist Julie Greene offers expert advice on looking fierce in a financial crisis.

shopping-bag-and-moneyIf you are like me (and lots of other people) your spring clothing budget isn’t what it used to be. I’ve had to accept the fact what I already own will, for the most part, have to get me through summer. Any dollars I do drop, I want to go as far as possible. And, I want to be sure every penny is well spent—on clothes I’ll love and wear, not items that I’ll find in a year with the tags still on. That means shopping thoughtfully and strategically, using these nine tips for getting the most out of spring spending.

Stylist Julie Greene offers expert advice on looking fierce in a financial crisis.

raybans 150Spring has finally sprung, and the urge to shop for new clothes is almost as strong as the need to find a way to pay for them. Luckily, you don’t have to spend a lot to look great this season. The biggest looks combine versatility with all-American style, and you only need five must-haves to update your wardrobe. Armed with these lists of essentials for him and her (and where to get them), you can even sneak your look into fall without spending a fortune.

Men
1. Cool Cardigan
Grandpa’s cardigan isn’t what it used to be; find one that flatters your shape and wear it all year round—the layering trend isn’t going anywhere. H&M, Bannana Republic and The Gap all have great options.

Stylist Julie Greene offers expert advice on looking fierce in a financial crisis.

face-150It’s been said many times, many ways—it’s all in the details. You put thought into the layout of your resume, and wouldn’t send it out with a typo. Maybe you pair your wine carefully with your food. Consider applying the same principles to the way you dress.

Seemingly small things can create harmony in your look and add a subtle—but very real—polish. They show the world that you are thorough and always on the ball. During a time of uncertainty, that is the perfect message to be sending out.

Here are eight surprising concepts that will create balance and give your look a little lift, without spending big bucks on a personal stylist. The best part? Most are just using what nature gave you…

Stylist Julie Greene offers expert advice on looking dashing in a downturn.

people silhouettes 150Right now, many of us are dealing with big transitions. Some of us are unemployed for the first time, others are having to shift the focus of their business, and still others are concerned about whether they’ll be able to move ahead. In short, everyone’s questioning their identity.

As I’ve said before, your clothes can help shape your future. Whether it’s a full style overhaul or just some refining, there are ways to approach how you dress that will reflect a new attitude towards your career and life—and managing your image and your message might help you land the next opportunity. Last week you started getting to know your unique sense of style. Now we’ll more firmly define it. Consider which of these 10 style identities best fits you—or who you want to be.

Stylist Julie Greene offers expert advice on looking fierce in a financial crisis.

mirrorFor the last three weeks, I’ve been encouraging you to let go of your closet clutter, get more mileage out of the clothes you own, and make a little cash from your cast-offs. Now it’s time to work on developing your overall sense of style.

What Wedding?

by Sara Clemence on March 6, 2009 in Lifestyle,Money

money bouquet 150Last spring, quite a few people—from Kiplinger to the National Association of Catering Executives—were suggesting that weddings might be recession-proof. As with so many ideas in the early stages of the downturn, that proved to be wrong. Everyone is getting pummeled now, including couples, vendors and honeymoon locations.

What’s an engaged pair to do? DIY Bride offers some practical advice on how to recession-proof the big day.

And The Royal Plantation Collection and ABCNews.com are hosting an online contest for a free honeymoon. Send a video (by March 9) explaining how the economy has affected your plans, and you could receive a five-day, four-night trip.

Each week, stylist Julie Greene offers expert advice on looking fierce in a financial crisis.

money-on-clothesline 150You’ve tried them on, mulled it over, considered repairs, and still can’t make certain clothes work for you. So they’ve been voted out of your closet, have been bid “Auf Wiedersehen.” Or, maybe you’ve decided to let go of some beloved pieces in order to put some money in your pocket.

Fortunately, one Fashionista’s trash is a Recessionista’s treasure (this goes for guys, too). As a former vintage clothing store-owner and power Ebay seller, I am all too familiar with the second-hand clothing market and how to get the most out of what you no longer need. Here are five ways to say farewell to your unwanted clothes with no regret or guilt—only gain.

Each week, stylist Julie Greene offers expert advice on looking fierce in a financial crisis.

clothing-pileWe all have them: Outdated, worn out, tired looking clothes that need a little—or a lot of—TLC. In more prosperous times, we can just toss and replace them. These days, it makes sense to get the most out of what you’ve already got. With a little creativity and a few dollars, you can make awkward items live up to their potential.

Read more…

Each week, stylist Julie Greene offers expert advice on looking fierce in a financial crisis.

hangersSitting around in your bathrobe waiting for the recession to end so you can start wearing your pinstripes or your Manolos again is not going to help matters. Throwing them away, however, just might.

Read more…